non-conformists

Frank Lenwood

Frank Lenwood was pastor of Plaistow Congregational Church from 1926 to 1934. Lenwood Hall in Coronation Road, built in 1957, is named for him.

Frank Lenwood

West Ham Central Mission

Birds-eye view showing the extensive development of hostels and social care facilities provided by the Mission clustered around the Church.

West Ham Central Mission

Manor Park Community Centre

Community Centre was formerly REHOBOTH Strict Baptist Chapel, High Street North, E6.


The Congregation traces its origins to 1830 with a move from Stepney, with a chapel opening in 1838. Ministers: J Milner 1831 -56, T Field 1856, S Cozens1861, John Brunt 1864, T Steed 1865-85, Jabez Parnell 1892-1915.The congregation moved to temporary rooms in 592 Romford Road in 1906 during Parnell's pastorate. In 1907 a church was built in High Street North, Manor Park with a new school room added in1928. In 1966 the membership was 20.  The church closed in the mid-1970s and the building converted into Manor Park Community Centre. Conversion work was carried out by the firm of Pegasus shop fitters of High Street North. (Note: the name Rehoboth means 'Broad Places' in Hebrew and is taken from the Old Testament)


(Text: Colin Marchant Faith Flows in Newham project 2010, with  information from Whitley 144  and additional information by Newham Heritage & Archives. Image by Matthew Crisp)

Manor Park Community Centre

Strict Baptists

 


STRICT BAPTISTS IN NEWHAM - FACT SHEET


Strict Baptists are a branch of the Christian faith. There have been eight congregations and churches in Newham, with three continuing.


WEST HAM TABERNACLE, West Ham Lane E15


The tabernacle meetings date from 1839, initially meeting at the home of John Champress with people from Zoar Chapel, Whitechapel and The Ark, Stratford; later hiring a stable loft for services. The first tabernacle was built in 1844 and enlarged in 1850. The work flourished under Jabez Humphreys (1896 -1901). The building was sold for road widening and moved to another site in West Ham Lane in 1903. The present building dates from 1926. Membership peaked at 240, declining from 1936, by 1966 it was 78.


ENON CHAPEL, Chapel Street, Stratford, E 15


This work was pioneered by Captain Whittle in about 1840. The Chapel was built in1842 and closed 1854 when Isabella Whittle sold it for use as Stratford Ragged School


GURNEY ROAD GRACE BAPTIST, Stratford, E15


This began in 1870 with a small group led by James Mortar, a local builder, meeting in a house in Forest Lane. They then moved to Chatsworth Road, using a room adjoining Mortar's house until 1882.They then met in a school in Buckingham Road, moving to an iron church in Gurney Road, moving into a permanent church in 1885 (probably built by Mortar). Ministers: J H Gray, 1870 -74; J H Lynn, 1875 -89; J C Hawson, 1891-93; E Marsh 1894 - 1904; H D Tooke, 1905 - 14; W S Bamber, 1915 - 17 Membership in 1889 was 149, which remained consistent until 1939, declining to 85 in 1966. Church was bombed in Second World War. Church's aim: "To preach the Gospel of the grace of God to all"


Listed by Whitley 482

Christ Church E13

CHRIST CHURCH, BARKING ROAD, PLAISTOW. Every picture tells a story. The site, name and people linked with this place all tell the story of accelerating change and dogged continuation.

Christ Church E13

St Cedd's

London Ghana Seventh Day Adventist Church.

St Cedd's

Brickfields Chapel

Brickfields, founded in 1662, is the oldest Dissenting/Free Church congregation in Newham. When King Charles II in 1660 demanded an oath of allegiance to the crown and the signing of the 39 Articles of Faith over 2000 clergy refused and started new congregations - many of whom take 1662 as the date of founding.

Brickfields Chapel

Unitarian Church, Stratford


Posted by: Robert Rogers


The Christian Unitarian Church was built in West Ham Lane, E.15 in 1869.

Unitarian  Church, Stratford
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